Bring Back Our Girls!


Reports have varied about the number of girls that are missing.  The Christian Association of Nigeria released 180 names.  The list shows that majority of the girls are Christian. However, there should be no separation between the Christian and Muslim names.  These girls are all God's children.  They belong to all of us.  We want ALL OF THEM BACK!  Equally important, are these all the names?  Are these some of the names?  Nobody knows at this point.  This is unacceptable and unjust..  

The problem Nigeria faces is one of human security that arises from the intersection of fundamental political, social and economic variables, and cannot be resolved without devising interlocking strategies that address all these spheres in a harmonized manner.
   
The Federal Government of Nigeria has the primary responsibility for leading, planning, and ensuring that the girls are united with their families.  This is what it means to be autonomous and independent.  It is also acceptable for the government to take an inventory of its capacity, identify gaps, and ask for help to ensure that these girls are rescued and united with their families.  

The help sought and provided should in no way entangle Nigeria in any alliance that would reduce its autonomy and independence.

We should resolve that the human security of all Nigerians is of utmost importance and embark on making serious, credible, coherent efforts to ensure that all Nigerians enjoy the benefits of being the largest economy in Africa.  


You may be interested in signing the petition "Over 200 girls are missing in Nigeria – so why doesn't anybody care? #234girls" on Change.org.

It's important. Will you sign it too? Here's the link:

http://www.change.org/petitions/over-200-girls-are-missing-in-nigeria-so-why-doesn-t-anybody-care-234girls?recruiter=13860377&utm_campaign=signature_receipt&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition




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