Thursday, December 21, 2017

SSRC'S APN Best of 2017: Fleeing Boko Haram: The Trauma of Captivity and Challenge of Freedom

Seasons Greetings! I am thankful that SSRC's African Peacebuilding Network gave Best of 2017 recognition to my paper: "Fleeing Boko Haram: The Trauma of Captivity and Challenge of Freedom". For me, the #BringBackOurGirls struggle continues till all our #ChibokGirls & all Boko Haram abductees are rescued & reunited with their families.





   
























Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Issue 9 of Ìrìnkèrindò: a Journal of African Migration is published

TITLE : STRUGGLING FOR SURVIVAL. (36 by 36 inches) by Gbolade Omidiran. This painting's medium is oil paints on black velvet rendered with various sizes of palette knives and not a single brush stroke. It was made in 2015. An impasto of striking colors that involves a lot of painstaking work.
DESCRIPTION: All over the world, people strive and struggle to survive. Whether in the most remote forest of Ijero Ekiti or the busiest streets of Lagos or New York, we all have one thing in common 'Struggling for Survival'. This painting though abstract in expression denotes the struggles in the rural African market to make a living. A variety of African indigenous foods and goods are displayed with the traders' frantic efforts to make sales, aimed at achieving survival.



Contents

Editorial

Mojúbàolú Olufúnké Okome .................................................................................................1

Breaching Fortress Europe: By Any Means Necessary: The Complications of African Migration to Europe. Mojúbàolú Olufúnké Okome ............................................................. 12

Socio-Political Transformations. Dmitri M. Bondarenko....................................................... 34

Area. Florence Nyemba and Lisa Vaughn........................................................................... 75

Immigrants in the United States. Guy-Lucien S. Whembolua, Donaldson Conserve, and Daudet Ilunga Tshiswaka ................................................................................................... 116

You can also access the full issue as one single document

STRUGGLING FOR SURVIVAL. (36 by 36 inches) by Gbolade Omidiran

Paul Gbolade Omidiran had his art training at Obafemi Awolowo University Ile- Ife, Osun State, Nigeria where he received the B.A. and M.F.A degrees in 1995 and 2000 respectively. He has to his credit eight solos and several group exhibitions. He has exhibited in Lagos, Kenya, Germany, London and the U.S.A. In 2000, he set up a private studio where he now works as a full time studio artist. Gbolade has also executed a lot of commissioned artistic projects.

Over the years, he has engaged cutting edge methods that explored the use of mixed media, and has now established a magical balance between painting, sculpture, and graphics. Gbolade is a member of Society of Nigerian Artists. He is married to a lawyer and blessed with children. He can be contacted at Omidiran Gallery, no 25, Ede Road, a stone’s throw from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife.

If interested in  the artwork, please contact the artist at:


Monday, December 4, 2017

One more article: Breaching Fortress Europe: By Any Means Necessary: The Complications of African Migration to Europe

Gbolade Omidiran's Movement of the People


My article, "Breaching Fortress Europe: By Any Means Necessary: TheComplications of African Migration to Europe" was first written for the conference: "African Refugees and Migrants at Europe's Door, on March 7 and 8, 2016, at Duke University. I was at the time living in in Gottingen, Germany, where I was a Senior Research Fellow at Max Planck Institute. Being in Europe opened my eyes to the plight of refugees in a new and different way, especially since some Germans thought I was a refugee, and I received the kind of treatment believed to be deserving by them.

It was odd to also be a Senior Research Fellow at Max Planck--the only reason I was in Germany--and to be treated with the respect that was believed appropriate once I stepped into the Institute.  The experiences of my time in Germany, and of crossing borders, from Germany to the UK, the US, and back were also interesting, since my color meant that people assumed I was a refugee in some instances. The American passport was read to mean I was African American by the border authorities, and this probably made my border crossings less onerous than for many others who may have been refugees.

l did some research in Bremen and London, which involved participant observation, interviews, and focus group discussions for my ongoing work on gender, power and leadership in the African-Initiated Church in Nigeria and her Diaspora. The research gave me more information and data on the lives of the African members of Eternal Sacred Order of the Cherubim and Seraphim (ESOCS) in both cities. This part of my research ended up in the paper I presented at Max Planck, and will also appear in my book whenever it's completed, but does not feature in this article. The updated article is now online. It's one more building block toward Issue 9 of Ìrìnkèrindò: a Journal of African Migration, which I already told you is a labor of love.

There's heartrending news on African migrants in Europe and along its borders. My article attempts to analyze some of the circumstances that we see unfolding. It also complicates and contextualizes African migration to Europe.

Look out for the final piece: the editorial. It's coming soon.

Gbolade Omidiran's Movement of the People

MOVEMENT OF THE PEOPLE. A very painstaking rendering, this painting is a mixed media painting comprising of leather, jute bag, melted plastics, cowrie shells, canvas and acrylics. Numerous strokes of interwoven colors also came into play in this painting that was recently made in 2016 by Gbolade Omidiran. The size is 36 by 36 inches.

Poverty is a peculiar problem among so many rural village dwellers. As such, the property accredited to a fully grown man could just be a sack load of his  belongings and two chickens. In situations like this, migrating  becomes the order of the day, probably in search of a better life. This painting titled the movement of the people depicts a group of villagers migrating from one community to another. Each one carries the property that they could easily lay their hands upon, setting out for a new and better life.

Paul Gbolade Omidiran had his art training at Obafemi Awolowo University Ile- Ife, Osun State,  Nigeria, where he received his B.A and M.F.A degrees in 1995 and 2000 respectively. He has eight solos and several group exhibitions to his credit. Gbolade has exhibited in Lagos, Kenya, Germany, London and U.S.A. In 2000, he set up a private studio where he now works as a full time studio artist. He has also executed a lot of commissioned artistic projects. Over the years, he has explored to advantage the use of mixed media having established a magical balance between painting, sculpture and graphics. Gbolade is a member of Society of Nigerian Artists, married to a lawyer and blessed with children. He can be contacted at Omidiran Gallery no 25, Ede road along Obafemi Awolowo University Ile-Ife.
Email: gboladeomidiran@yahoo.com
Phone+234-8034031136.
Website...www.gboladeomidiran.com.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Issue 9 of Ìrìnkèrindò: a Journal of African Migration is in progress

Gbolade Omidiran's "No One in Sight"


My overworked and underpaid self is happy to announce that Issue 9 of Ìrìnkèrindò: a Journal of African Migration is in progress, a testament to tenacity and very much a labor of love, since I'm doing most of the work, while also teaching etc, etc. You can access three articles now and will be able to access the editorial and one more article by December 15.

These articles below are already online:

African Migrants in Post-Soviet Moscow: Adaptation and Integration in a Time of Radical Socio-Political Transformations 
by Dmitri M. Bondarenko of The Institute for African Studies,  Russian Academy of Sciences

Here's the abstract:
The changes since the breakup of the USSR have impacted African migrants’ social
composition, as well as their strategies and forms of adaptation and integration in the capital
city of Moscow. In this study, we discuss the factors influencing the choices of African
migrants, related to their background as Africans and to their perceptions of the receiving
society. We distinguish between two social groups of African migrants and argue that while
one group seeks integration into the Russian society, the other limits itself to mere adaptation
to life in Moscow.

Keywords: African migrants, community, diaspora, megacity, Moscow, socio-cultural
adaptation, socio-cultural integration
Want to read more?  Just click on the title above.

There's also
Exploring the Migration Experiences of Black Zimbabwean Women in the Greater Cincinnati Area
by Florence Nyemba of The University of Cincinnati, and
Lisa Vaughn of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Here's the abstract:
This article explores the migration experiences of Zimbabwean immigrant women living in the
Greater Cincinnati, Ohio area. It argues that despite the increased population of women
migrating, sometimes alone, in search of a better lifestyle, their unique experiences have
remained invisible in studies on migration. The study followed a participatory research approach
and used a photovoice method for data collection. Over a period of seven months, participants
took photographs that vividly captured their experiences. Implications from the findings and the
nature of the photovoice as a participatory approach for future research with Zimbabwean
immigrant women are presented.

Keywords: Migration, Zimbabwean women, photovoice, participatory research
Once again if you want to read more, just click on the title above.

Finally, there's

Socio-cultural Factors Influencing the Ebola Virus Disease-related Stigma among African Immigrants in the United States

by Guy-Lucien S. Whembolua of The Department of Africana Studies, University of Cincinnati,
Donaldson Conserve of Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, and
Daudet Ilunga Tshiswaka of the Department of Public Health, University of West Florida

Here's the abstract:
African immigrants, one of the fastest-growing immigrant populations in the United States
(U.S.), face many unique challenges. Since December 2013, the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) has
been claiming lives and altering the societies of origin of West and Central African immigrants.
Using the PEN-3 cultural model, a thematic analysis of mainstream U.S. news media was
conducted to assess the socio-cultural factors influencing EVD-related stigma experienced by
African immigrants. Results of this analysis revealed the perceptions and enabling/nurturing
factors that exacerbated or prevented EVD-related stigma. Future interventions designed to
address stigma experienced by African immigrants should include EVD-related stigma.

Keywords: Ebola, African immigrants, Stigma, Health

You can read the full article by clicking on the title above.

Look out for the full issue on December 15.



NO ONE IN SIGHT: The technique in this painting is called 'araism' , coined from the Yoruba word ara which literally means extraordinary patterns or motifs. Hence, this technique is characterized by different intricate patterns and motifs to give forms. Executed on a black canvas with the use of acrylic paints, the 24 by 48 inch painting was created in 2015.

DESCRIPTION: African villages are never devoid of people. When the young able bodies are away on their farms and most women are away at the market to sell their goods, there are still people around the streets, especially the very old and the very young ones. In a situation where there is no one in sight, definitely something must have gone awry that could have caused the total migration of the people - probably war, epidemic, or the town-crier delivering an urgent message from the king that a ritual is to be performed and everyone should stay indoors. This African street painting depicted with lots of houses on both left and right side and yet no human being is in sight! Definitely there are a lot of untold stories behind this unusual situation.

The artist whose work is featured in Ìrìnkèrindò: a Journal of African Migration is Paul Gbolade Omidiran, who had his art training at Obafemi Awolowo University Ile- Ife, Osun State, Nigeria where he received the B.A. and M.F.A degrees in 1995 and 2000 respectively. He has to his credit eight solos and several group exhibitions. He has exhibited in Lagos, Kenya, Germany, London and the U.S.A. In 2000, he set up a private studio where he now works as a full time studio artist. Gbolade has also executed a lot of commissioned artistic projects. Over the years, he has engaged cutting edge methods that explored the use of mixed media, and has now established a magical balance between painting, sculpture, and graphics. Gbolade is a member of Society of Nigerian Artists. He is married to a lawyer and blessed with children. He can be contacted at Omidiran Gallery, no 25, Ede road, a stone’s throw from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife.

Email: gboladeomidiran@yahoo.com
Phone: +234-8034031136
Website: www.gboladeomidiran.com

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Another Chibok Schoolgirl Rescued





The news about the rescue of one more of our #ChibokGirls gives cause for optimism on the release/rescue of the 112 #ChibokGirls still in captivity.  The Federal Government of Nigeria (FGN) is to be commended for its promise to #BringBackOurGirls. We urge that it redoubles the efforts to rescue them and all other abducted Nigerians from captivity. As the rescue or release happens, we urge the FGN to develop a comprehensive framework for cutting edge psychosocial care and long term support that create conditions for recovery as well as enhanced capacity to resume a modicum of normalcy in their lives.


Monday, May 8, 2017

Joyful for release of ChibokGirls82. Praying for 113's release/rescue



Today, I am joyful and am celebrating with our #ChibokGirls82 who are now in Abuja, and their parents and families. 



While I am grateful that the Federal Government of Nigeria has negotiated for these young women's release, I am also praying that they and all those rescued and released before will get the culturally appropriate, long term psychosocial care that they need to cope with the trauma they've been through.  


It's imperative that they are given this support so they can resume some modicum of normalcy in their lives.



It's also heartbreaking that 113 young women and so many other Nigerians and West Africans are still held captive by these homicidal psychopaths. Praying too that they are rescued or released sooner rather than later, and that the people of the affected areas experience peace after this long-drawn out ordeal.  Let's keep praying and agitating that the Federal Government of Nigeria #BringBackOurGirls!


  Rebecca Samuel Yaga (to the right), mother of one of the missing Chibok girls. Her daughter is one of the #ChibokGirls82 just released. She relocated to Abuja and has been involved in the BBOG campaign for the rescue of our #ChibokGirls. The photo above was taken in Abuja during the #3YearsOn global week of action.

 Rebecca Samuel Yaga, mother of one of the missing Chibok girls. Her daughter is one of the #ChibokGirls82 just released. Needless to say, now she is joyful. We hope all other parents and family members would have a similar experience.
 Rebecca Samuel Yaga, mother of one of the missing Chibok girls. Her daughter is one of the #ChibokGirls82 just released. We rejoice with her.

As you can see from the link above, President Muhammadu Buhari is ill, and must now be in London for medical treatment. He is to be commended for keeping his word on fighting Boko Haram to reclaim Nigerian people and territory. This release is due to his administration's willingness to do what must be done to rescue our #ChibokGirls.  We pray for his full and speedy recovery.  He said in this speech: "These dear daughters of ours have seen the worst the world has to offer. It is now time for them to experience the best..."  He also promised to rescue all others.  We must remind him and the Federal Government of Nigeria of this promise until each and everyone of those held captive is released. If they are to get the very best of all the world has to offer, they must receive the best psychosocial care, inclusive of education and career opportunities.  Let's keep on advocating for our girls and everyone that's been tormented by Boko Haram. If we take excellent care of them, Nigeria will be the better for it. 

Please keep agitating: #BringBackOurGirls!


THE MISSED OPPORTUNITIES TO RESCUE THE CHIBOK GIRLS

  October 11, 2019 – International Day of the Girl Child FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE +2348057799777 (Abuja); +2347087784788 (Lagos...